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Success Story – Soccer

Jordin Schaller plays all around the soccer field. She excels at the defender, striker and midfield positions because she works hard at what she does and never gives up. Coaches love a hard-working, versatile player, and this is one of many reasons that Jordin earned a spot on a college soccer team.

Read her story to hear about how she overcame the struggles of the recruitment process, trouble with contacting college coaches and figured out how to stand out and market herself in order to play at the next level.

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Jordin Schaller, Defender/Striker/Midfield

When did you start playing your sport? How did you decide to play your sport as opposed to another?

I started playing soccer when I was 6 years. I was interested in it because my older sister played.

What do you like most about your sport?

I like that it’s a team sport, and it’s a tough sport! It’s fun and the training is always different and interesting.

What are the biggest obstacles in your sport that you’ve overcome? How did you overcome it?

There are lots of injuries in soccer. Also, when you play club soccer you can sometimes have people who get better or worse than the rest of the club team, but the team don’t move them up or down. Your team tends to stay the same which means there are lots of players at different levels when you get to U17 and U18.

What are the biggest obstacles in the recruitment process that you’ve encountered and/or overcome? How did you overcome it (if you did yet?)

It was hard when the coaches can’t contact you. Sometimes it felt like we were putting a lot of information out and getting nothing back except general emails about soccer camps.

How do you balance being a good athlete with being a good student?

Time management. You need to have a schedule and you have to ask your teachers to help when your sport schedule means you might miss assignments or tests.

When did you realize you wanted to play college sports?

I knew I wanted to go to college and I love soccer so mixing the two was a good idea.

Where did you first turn for recruitment tools, platforms, strategies, etc.?

My club team coach recommended CaptainU last season when we were in the U16 groups.

What things have worked and what things haven’t/didn’t work when trying to get in touch with coaches?

Like I said above, there were lots of emails about camps and mailings about the camps, too. It is scary having to call coaches because they can’t contact you. It would be helpful if the CaptainU helped with the NCAA eligibility center, too.

How was your family involved & how was this helpful?

My dad and my stepmother helped me with CaptainU. They helped to send out the emails and helped me to write them.

What tools, platforms, strategies did you use throughout the whole process?

I liked the tournament lists. When I put in the college showcases I was going to, CaptainU would update the list of coaches that were going, too. That was helpful. I did have to go to the tournament websites sometimes. The lists of coaches were not always the same.

What worked best for you on CaptainU / what was your favorite CaptainU tool?

I liked the mail tool. It was nice that it would forward the messages to your outside email.

What would be three recommendations you have to athletes trying to play in college?

Go to college showcases, send emails to loads of coaches early on, and don’t be afraid to call the coaches for schools you are interested in.

Finally, what are your goals for the coming year in your sport?

Goals for my junior year are to help my high school team get to the state playoffs and to keep up my GPA. So far we are doing well with our leagues games, and OK with the tough games against state champions and runners up that my coach scheduled. My GPA is doing well. I have been working with my teachers and my science classes are helping the other classes to keep my GPA up high!

Want to take your game to the next level and play in college? Get started with a CaptainU profile today!

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